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    • EOS survey shows: receivables managers fear job losses due to AI
    • For one in three companies, AI is a trending issue that is overrated
    • Lack of trust in artificial intelligence across Europe

    Hamburg, November 5, 2019 – European companies are skeptical of artificial intelligence (AI). This is one of the insights from the representative survey “European Payment Practices” 2019 conducted by research institute Kantar on behalf of financial services provider EOS. It found that almost half of the financial executives polled believe that AI is a threat to jobs. Confidence in self-learning intelligent systems is low: only one in five companies can imagine relying wholly on artificial intelligence in receivables management. The survey polled 3,400 companies in 17 European countries.

    Information the key to countering skepticism about AI

    “As the survey shows, there is widespread skepticism in European companies towards the use of artificial intelligence. The only way to counter this is through awareness-raising, because those who immediately associate AI with the battle between man and machine often lack the necessary background information,” stresses Joachim Göller, Head of EOS Group’s Center of Analytics. Göller and his team are working on AI solutions that support EOS with receivables management. “My experience is that the more our colleagues engage with the topic the more likely it is that their prejudices diminish. Because when you use AI tools in your day-to-day work it quickly becomes apparent that they help you do your own job and are not a threat to it.”

    Western Europeans are somewhat more optimistic about the future

    Trepidation about AI is also reflected in the fact that only 30 percent of the financial executives polled assume that artificial intelligence will be a trending issue in the next two years, while 36 percent consider it “completely overrated”. As the EOS survey shows, Eastern European companies are on the whole more skeptical than their Western European counterparts. For example, only 17 percent of respondents in Eastern Europe can imagine relying completely on AI, compared with 22 percent in Western Europe. Anxiety about job losses is also greater in Eastern Europe, where 49 percent think AI is a threat to jobs, a concern shared by 43 percent in Western Europe. Incidentally, the greatest optimism about AI is found in Denmark, where just under a third of companies (the highest figure in Europe) can imagine relying completely on artificial intelligence in the future.

    Hopes for lower error rates

    Even if the companies from Europe that responded to the survey are overwhelmingly skeptical, some do see the potential offered by AI solutions. For example, a quarter see self-learning systems as a necessary component of receivables management. And 30 percent of financial executives assume that AI will “drastically reduce” error rates.

    In Europe there is a lack of trust in artificial intelligence

    “I can well imagine relying completely on artificial intelligence.”

    19%

    “I can’t wait to work with artificial intelligence in receivables management.”

    18%

    “The use of artificial intelligence in receivables management puts jobs at risk.”

    47%

    “Artificial intelligence will be a trending issue in receivables management in the next two years.”

    30%

    “Artificial intelligence is just a buzzword and is completely overrated.”

    36%


    Please find further information in our EOS newsroom.

    About the EOS Survey “European Payment Practices” 2019

    In partnership with independent market research institute Kantar, EOS conducted phone interviews with 3,400 companies in 17 European countries to ask them about the prevailing payment practices in their respective locations. In the spring of 2019, 200 companies with an annual turnover of more than EUR 5 million in each of the countries Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK answered questions about their own payment experiences and current issues relating to risk and receivables management. The annual survey has now been conducted by EOS no less than 12 times.

    About EOS Group

    EOS Group is a leading international provider of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables, EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company’s core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, EOS Group has a workforce of more than 7,500 and over 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce. EOS is part of Otto Group.

    Print
    • Only 49 percent of companies rate their degree of digitalization as high or very high
    • Just 17 percent already have a fully digitalized dunning system
    • 55 percent have hardly or only partially digitalized their dunning processes

    Hamburg, October 23, 2019 – The digital transformation of European industry is currently a picture of two halves: Whereas half of companies give themselves high marks, the other half is only getting an average score for digitalization compared with others in the sector, or may even regard itself as having a below-average level of digitalization. A mere 14 percent of those polled state that their own company has a very high degree of digitalization, while another 35 percent rate their progress as high. These are some of the insights from the representative survey “European Payment Practices” 2019, which polled 3,400 companies in 17 European countries.

    Digital dunning systems: majority of companies in a poor position

    As the survey shows, the majority of European companies (55 percent) still need to catch up when it comes to digitalizing their dunning processes. 38 percent of firms have only partially digitalized their dunning systems, while 17 percent have hardly done anything at all about digitalizing these processes.

     

    Europe

    Fully digital dunning system

    17%

    Dunning system largely digital

    24%

    Dunning system semi digital

    38%

    Hardly digitalized at all

    17%

    The digitalization process necessitates a substantial financial investment

    “As the figures show, more than half of the European companies polled have room for improvement in respect of their digital dunning systems. There is an acute need for action here to reduce payment defaults,” stresses Justus Hecking-Veltman, Chief Financial Officer of EOS Group. “A manual, analog dunning system is not just susceptible to errors but generally does not reach the customer on what is the most suitable communication channel for them at the best possible time.”

    The financial expert sees the main reason for the slow pace of digitalization as being the significant investment needed to convert dunning processes. “The introduction of digital tools and processes calls for an appropriate mindset as well as substantial financial resources,” says Hecking-Veltman. “Not every company can afford it or wants to. At EOS for example, we invested around EUR 10 million in the last fiscal year alone in the digital upgrade of our core collection systems.”

    Please find further information in our EOS newsroom.

    About the EOS Survey “European Payment Practices” 2019

    In partnership with independent market research institute Kantar, EOS conducted phone interviews with 3,400 companies in 17 European countries to ask them about the prevailing payment practices in their respective locations. In the spring of 2019, 200 companies with an annual turnover of more than EUR 5 million in each of the countries Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK answered questions about their own payment experiences and current issues relating to risk and receivables management. The annual survey has now been conducted by EOS no less than 12 times.

    About EOS Group

    EOS Group is a leading international provider of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables, EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company’s core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, EOS Group has a workforce of more than 7,500 and over 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce. EOS is part of Otto Group.

    Print
    • Financial executives across Europe see cyber security and data protection as major trends in the next two years
    • Just 28 percent are already working on issues of cyber security in receivables management
    • Western Europeans more active in dealing with data protection than Eastern Europeans

    Hamburg, September 24, 2019 – If you ask major European companies about the trends in receivables management in the next two years, most will cite security issues, regardless of their country. 52 percent attach great importance to data protection, and 49 percent to cyber security. This was one of the insights from the survey “European Payment Practices” 2019, which polled 3,400 companies in 17 European countries on behalf of financial services provider EOS. Astonishingly, although cyber security is seen as a trending issue in receivables management, just 28 percent of the European companies taking part in the survey have taken any action in this area. In Western Europe, every third company is actively addressing this issue (33 percent), while in Eastern Europe it’s only one in four (25 percent). Companies are doing a little better at improving data protection. Nevertheless, despite the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which entered into force in 2018, only 67 percent of Western European and 55 percent of Eastern European companies are actively addressing this issue.

    Risk of loss of revenue due to cyber attacks

    “The survey shows that the question of cyber security is still being neglected by many financial executives,” says Gunnar Woitack, Chief Information Security Officer (CISO) at EOS Group. “This is negligent and can lead to significant economic losses. There is a massive need for investment in this area.” A study by management consultancy Accenture revealed that USD 5.2 trillion in revenue could be lost to companies worldwide in the next five years as a result of cyber attacks.

    Planned hacker attacks boost cyber security

    To ensure the greatest possible level of data security at the more than 60 EOS companies in 26 countries, Woitack regularly engages the services of specialized hackers from outside the company who scan the virtual defenses of EOS for breaches. “Naturally it is painful in that first moment when the outside professionals manage to overcome our defenses in what are known as penetration tests,” he admits. “But this is the only way to reveal our potential vulnerabilities and close them before an actual data theft can occur.”

    The major trends in receivables management in the next 2 years are …

      Western Europe Eastern Europe Total

    Measures to improve data protection

    51% 52% 52%

    ... Cyber security

    52% 47% 49%

    Trending measures already being implemented …

      Western Europe Eastern Europe Total

    Measures to improve data protection

    67% 55% 60%

    ... Cyber security

    33% 25% 28%


    Please find further information in our EOS newsroom.

    About the EOS Survey “European Payment Practices” 2019

    In partnership with independent market research institute Kantar, EOS conducted phone interviews with 3,400 companies in 17 European countries to ask them about the prevailing payment practices in their respective locations. In the spring of 2019, 200 companies with an annual turnover of more than EUR 5 million in each of the countries Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK answered questions about their own payment experiences and current issues relating to risk and receivables management. The annual survey has now been conducted by EOS no less than 12 times.

    About EOS Group

    EOS Group is a leading international provider of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables, EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company’s core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, EOS Group has a workforce of more than 7,500 and over 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce. EOS is part of Otto Group.

    Print
    • Just 28 percent of European companies offer their customers digital payment methods
    • On average, four different payment options are offered
    • Mobile payment is gaining ground, but cryptocurrencies are rarely accepted

    Hamburg, September 18, 2019 – In Europe, digital payment methods continue to play a minor role, with just 28 percent of companies offering their customers digital payment options, down slightly on the previous year (2018: 29 percent). Whereas in Western Europe just under a third (32 percent) offer their customers this option, only around a quarter of companies in Eastern Europe do so (26 percent). Just 23 percent of European companies offer online transfers via third-party providers, while the availability of mobile payment is seven percent and rising (up from five percent in 2018). Cryptocurrencies continue to be a niche phenomenon and are rarely accepted as a means of payment. On average, customers are only offered four different payment methods. The survey commissioned on behalf of financial services provider EOS polled 3,400 companies in 17 European countries.

    Across Europe, conventional payment methods dominate

    The most popular payment method in Europe is still the traditional bank transfer, which is offered by 81 percent of all companies. This is followed by payment on account (69 percent) and advance payment (50 percent). “As our survey shows, European companies are still lagging far behind when it comes to using digital payment methods,” says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group. “In a digitalized environment it will not suffice in the long term to rely solely on traditional payment methods. Companies should gear themselves systematically to customer needs and increase the number of payment options possible so as not to miss the boat. At EOS we also regularly check which payment methods are best suited to which country, so that defaulting payers can settle their debts in a way that is convenient for them.” EOS Group is represented in 26 countries worldwide.

    Payment methods offered in Europe:

      2019 2018
    Traditional payment methods 100% 100%
    Bank transfer 81% 82%
    Payment on account 69% 64%
    Payment in advance 50% 52%
    Cash payment/payment on collection 42% 39%
    Direct debit 38% 29%
    Credit card 37% 32%
    Payment in installments/financing 31% 33%
    Debit card 28% 26%
     
    Digital Payment methods 28% 29%
    Online transfers via third party providers 23% 23%
    Mobile payment 7% 5%
    e-Wallets 4% 5%
    Cryptocurrencies 1% 1%

    “Please state which of the following payment methods you currently offer your 
    customers for settling their bills.” / Multiple responses possible.

    Please find further information in our EOS newsroom.

    About the EOS Survey “European Payment Practices” 2019

    In partnership with independent market research institute Kantar, EOS conducted phone interviews with 3,400 companies in 17 European countries to ask them about the prevailing payment practices in their respective locations. In the spring of 2019, 200 companies with an annual turnover of more than EUR 5 million in each of the countries Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK answered questions about their own payment experiences and current issues relating to risk and receivables management. The annual survey has now been conducted by EOS no less than 12 times.

    About EOS Group

    EOS Group is a leading international provider of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables, EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company’s core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, EOS Group has a workforce of more than 7,500 and over 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce. EOS is part of Otto Group.

    Print
    • Payment practices continue to improve, with 81 percent of all invoices being paid on time
    • But future outlook more pessimistic than of late
    • Consumers more reliable payers than business customers

    Hamburg, September 9, 2019 – Payment practices in Europe have continued to improve in both the B2C and B2B segments, with 81 percent of all invoices currently being paid on time. Five years ago it was just 75 percent. In Eastern Europe, four out of five payments arrive on time (80 percent); in Western Europe it’s as much as 83 percent. Punctual payment is especially high in Russia, where 89 percent of all receivables are paid on time, followed by Germany (86 percent) and Denmark (85 percent). In Europe, Slovakia (76 percent), Bulgaria and Greece (each 77 percent) are bringing up the rear for punctuality. The representative survey “European Payment Practices” 2019, conducted on behalf of financial services provider EOS, polled 3,400 companies in 17 European countries.

    The outlook is gloomy – is the tide about to turn for payment practices?

    Despite the ongoing positive trend in payment practices, European companies are meanwhile looking skeptically to the future. Only 22 percent expect a significant improvement in payment practices in the next two years; in 2018 the figure was 24 percent. On the other hand, 15 percent of those polled expect things to get worse; that’s an increase of two percent compared with the previous year. In Western Europe, companies from Germany and the UK are particularly negative about the future. In Eastern Europe, it is primarily companies from Russia and Slovenia that assume an adverse trend.

    “The survey confirms what many current economic forecasts are also showing: the mood in the European economy is no longer as optimistic as it has been in recent years,” says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group. “In the UK, a possible no-deal Brexit is dampening expectations, and in Germany the negative economic outlook in particular is having an impact on morale. If global trade disputes are further exacerbated, a decline in payment levels in Europe can be expected as early as next year.”

    Five-year trend: payment terms in Europe were reduced and payment practices improved ...

      2019 2014
    Average payment term 33 days 37 days
    Receivables paid on time 81% 75%
    Receivables paid late or unrecoverable 19% 25%

     

    … but how long will the trend continue?

      2019 2018

    “Payment practices will generally/significantly improve in the next two years”

    22% 24%

    “Payment practices will generally/significantly deteriorate in the next two years.”

    15% 13%

     

    Majority still dispenses with outside support for receivables management

    In Europe, companies getting professional support with their receivables management are still in the minority. Just four out of ten companies (42 percent) work with external service providers to recover outstanding debts. “With a view to a potentially depressed economic climate in particular, those companies not already doing so should professionalize their receivables management to a greater extent and look at working with external collection providers, to keep their cash flows stable in the event of a possible decline in the level of payments,” says Engberding.

    Consumers more reliable payers than companies

    As the EOS Survey shows, European companies set their customers an average payment term of 33 days; five years ago they were allowed four days more. Whereas in 84 percent of cases consumers and private customers meet this deadline, only 79 percent of companies manage to do so. The main reasons for payment delays cited by the respondents were primarily cash flow problems in the B2C segment (57 percent) and in the B2B segment, outstanding payments by a customer’s own clients (55 percent) and the use of supplier credits (51 percent).

    Please find further information in our EOS newsroom.

     

    About the EOS Survey “European Payment Practices” 2019

    In partnership with independent market research institute Kantar, EOS conducted phone interviews with 3,400 companies in 17 European countries to ask them about the prevailing payment practices in their respective locations. In the spring of 2019, 200 companies with an annual turnover of more than EUR 5 million in each of the countries Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Croatia, Denmark, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Russia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland, and the UK answered questions about their own payment experiences and current issues relating to risk and receivables management. The annual survey has now been conducted by EOS no less than 12 times.

    About EOS Group

    EOS Group is a leading international provider of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables, EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company’s core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, EOS Group has a workforce of more than 7,500 and over 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce. EOS is part of Otto Group.

    Print
    • New highs in revenue and EBITDA
    • Strong investment in debt purchases: another step towards becoming a global financial investor
    • “We will greatly expand our real estate-secured business, besides unsecured debt purchasing.”

    Hamburg, Germany; July 16, 2019 – EOS Group, with headquarters in Hamburg, increased its revenue in financial 2018/19 by 2.3 percent to EUR 813.7 million. Earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) grew to EUR 283.6 million. Thus, the international provider of customized financial services, which belongs to Otto Group, chalked up a new record in both key performance indicators. One of the main reasons for the positive development was the high investment in the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios: EOS invested EUR 668 million in receivables and real estate in the last financial year and is evolving more and more into a global financial investor.

    Find an overview of the EOS Group‘s key performance indicators in our
    online annual report.

    High investment in debt purchases continues unabated

    “I am happy about the extremely satisfactory financial year,” says Klaus Engberding, Chairman of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors. “Both for revenue and for profit, we once again achieved an outstanding level. Despite the financial year harmonization in the previous year*, we were able to increase the revenue of EOS Group. This is a clear sign of our sustainable business growth,” states Engberding. “We will greatly expand our real estate-secured business, besides unsecured debt purchasing. With our data-driven technologies, we can optimally assess and process receivables – the perfect basis for continuing to invest strongly in worldwide debt purchases.”

    *In the 2017–2018 reporting period around 30 EOS companies were included with 14 instead of 12 months in the consolidated year-end financial statements.

    EOS Group comprises more than 60 companies in 26 countries and employs more than 7,500 people. Via a partner network, EOS offers smart services to its around 20,000 customers in 180 countries around the world.

    Germany remains most important EOS market

    With a share of around 42 percent of consolidated revenue, Germany remains the strongest market in EOS Group in terms of revenue. In financial 2018/19 sales revenue there rose to EUR 341.1 million. “Despite the aggressive price competition, we were able to not only increase our investments in debt purchases by around a quarter but also expand our fiduciary business by 18 percent,” explains Andreas Kropp, Member of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors and responsible for the German market. “We also stepped up investments in real estate-secured receivables and real estate to be restructured. Our inventory of commercial real estate nearly doubled.”

    Eastern Europe with an increase in secured receivables

    In Eastern Europe, EOS is enjoying all-time highs: “We are very proud of our result in Eastern Europe for the last financial year,” says Marwin Ramcke, Member of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors and responsible for this region. “At 203.2 million euros, revenue exceeds that of the previous year by more than ten percent. Earnings before tax are also much higher than in last reporting period.” For both KPIs, EOS reached the highest level ever in this region. “We were able to increase our investment volume in bad debt portfolios again. Especially in Poland and Croatia, but also in Russia and Slovakia, the level from the previous year was clearly surpassed,” comments Ramcke. Investment in secured receivables in particular was expanded; EOS is now active in this field in nine Eastern European countries. Ramcke: “We continue to see excellent growth opportunities in this segment and plan on expanding the business segment to all our Eastern European locations in the future.” 

    Growth in Western Europe and North America

    Adjusted for a one-time effect, the revenue of EOS for West Europe showed an increase. “One of the reasons for our positive development in this region was stronger investments in debt purchases,” comments Andreas Witzig, Member of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors and responsible for the regions of Western Europe and North America. “Thus, for example, we were able to acquire a portfolio from mortgage lender Crédit Immobilier de France with a nominal value of EUR 125 million. Also in Austria and Switzerland, we were clearly above and in Belgium slightly above the planned volume with our investments in debt portfolios.” In the region of North America, EOS was able to post an increase in revenue of a good 10 percent.

    About EOS Group

    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company's core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has a workforce of around 7,500 and more than 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce. EOS is part of Otto Group.

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  • Hamburg, Germany, July 3, 2019 – Good news for the EOS Group: for the 15th time in a row, EOS Holding, the international financial investor’s parent company, received an A-rating for creditworthiness. The auditors from Euler Hermes Rating attested that EOS continues to present a low financial risk. The rating experts cited the high stability of the company’s cash flows and the continued very high level of earnings as the rationale for the rating. The auditors also expect a stable performance for the coming 12 months.

    Euler Hermes considered the longstanding experience of EOS in the valuation, acquisition and recovery of non-performing debt, its market leadership in Germany and strong position in the Western and Eastern European markets to be especially positive factors. EOS has more than 60 subsidiaries in 26 countries.

    "We are delighted that the auditors again confirmed the high level and stability of our earning power, and that their report specifically emphasized our extensive experience in receivables purchasing and recovery," says Justus Hecking-Veltman, Member of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors and Chief Financial Officer. "In fiscal 2018/19 we invested EUR 668 million in receivables and real estate. We are aiming to again purchase secured and unsecured debt portfolios of this magnitude in this current financial year."

    About the EOS Group
    The EOS Group is a leading international provider of customized financial services. As a specialist in the evaluation and processing of receivables, EOS deploys new technologies to offer its some 20,000 customers in 26 countries financial security through smart services. The company's core business is the purchase of unsecured and secured debt portfolios. Working within an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has a workforce of around 7,500 and more than 60 subsidiaries, so it can access resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities, real estate and e-commerce.

    Justus Hecking-Veltman, Chief Financial Officer, EOS Group
    Justus Hecking-Veltman, Director Financiero, Grupo EOS
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  • Hamburg, 29.05.2018 - The EOS Group is planning to sell Hamburg-based Health AG and Zahnärztekasse AG, which is located in Switzerland. The companies, both of which have a strong position in the market, offer potential buyers the ideal conditions for establishing a pan-European platform in dental factoring. In addition, the innovative practice management software "Hēa" will enable the development of new markets.

    'Our two companies are operating in future markets – healthcare and technology', says Klaus Engberding, CEO of EOS. 'To tap into additional business segments and new markets in the health sector we are now seeking the most suitable future owner to actively support the companies during their next growth phases.' With a factoring volume of around EUR 1 billion, Health AG and Zahnärztekasse AG, together, generate sales in the mid double-digit million Euro range.

    Sale by auction
    Health AG and Zahnärztekasse AG will be offered for sale together. The sale will be managed by means of a structured auction procedure and potential investors will be approached as of June 2018. Interested parties can submit a non-binding offer by the beginning of September. The completion of the transaction is planned for February 2019. In the past, strategic buyers and financial investors have shown great interest in Health AG and Zahnärztekasse AG. EOS has engaged investment bank Lazard (Frankfurt branch) to ensure an efficient sale process.

    Health AG
    Health AG, consisting of EOS Health Honorarmanagement AG and EOS Health IT-Concept GmbH, is a provider of financial and IT services for the health market. With more than 2000 customers it is one of the market leaders in German dental factoring. Moreover, thanks to its recently introduced practice management software Hēa, the company is now a frontrunner in the e-health segment: Hēa digitises, networks and simplifies all processes for the web-based management of dental practices with a focus on billing. Since its establishment in 2005, the company has evolved from a factoring start-up to an independent company providing financial and technology services.

    Zahnärztekasse AG
    Zahnärztekasse AG is a financial services provider in the health sector and with 1000 customers has become the market leader in the Swiss dental factoring segment. Its customised and modular based services, combined with an efficient IT infrastructure, relieves medical practice teams of administrative tasks and secures the liquidity of its clients. Since its foundation in 1963 the company has become established as a reliable partner to Swiss dentists.

    Contact for press and media:
    fischerAppelt, relations GmbH
    Email: eos@fischerappelt.de, Tel.: +49 40 899 699 347

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  • Majority of EU companies associate new European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) with even more data security in the receivables management segment / Companies report extra work above all in administrative and HR areas / More than 10 percent of EU companies not familiar with GDPR

    Hamburg, 22 May 2018 – Europe’s companies generally have a positive attitude to the EU General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), despite the extra work involved. This is because more than two thirds (69 percent) of all European companies that rate the new regulation as relevant to them will benefit from greater data security in receivables management. This applies in particular to Spanish and Danish companies (each 78 percent); in Germany, on the other hand, the figure is 71 percent. These results were the outcome of a special analysis by the EOS Group on the impact of the new regulation in Europe. The survey polled 3,000 companies in 15 European countries. The analysis is part of the EOS Survey ‘European Payment Practices' 2018 conducted by independent market research institute Kantar TNS.

    GDPR: Only just over half of EU companies considers it relevant
    ‘The special analysis shows how important data security and data protection are for European companies,’ explains Kirsten Pedd, Chief Compliance Officer and Chief General Counsel of the EOS Group in Germany. ‘Nevertheless there are still companies that are not familiar with the GDPR at all. There is a risk that the regulation is being taken lightly.’ The EOS analysis shows that 11 percent of the EU companies polled have not known about the GDPR so far. A quarter of the companies surveyed (25 percent) are familiar with the regulation but think it is not very relevant or not relevant at all to their own business. Only just over half (57 percent) of companies polled consider the new regulation to be relevant to them.

    Extra work throughout Europe - espacially in the administrative and HR areas
    The 57 percent of EU companies that recognise that the GDPR is relevant to them also report that there is extra work involved, primarily affecting administration. As well as an increase in documentation obligations, around two thirds (69 percent) of companies say that there is more bureaucracy as a result of implementing the regulation and an increase in information obligations (65 percent). More than half of the companies (55 percent) also report an increase in the need for personnel resources. A total of 26 percent of companies even state that the GDPR could jeopardise their business model.

    Receivables management: companies well prepared
    ‘Although most experts for receivables management are prepared for the extra work that may be involved, they clearly associate the GDPR with more data security and data protection,’ concludes Kirsten Pedd. ‘Thanks to this clear awareness, companies are well prepared for the implementation of the regulation.’

    The GDPR applies to all EU companies from 25 May
    The GDPR is a regulation of the European Union that affects private companies and public bodies. The regulation has been in force since 25 May 2016, but all EU countries have to implement it from 25 May 2018. The objective of the regulation is to protect personal data within the EU and ensure free movement of data within the EU single market.


    About the EOS survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2018
    In the spring of 2018, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,400 companies with a minimum of 20 staff and an annual turnover of at least €5 million about prevailing local payment practices, economic developments in their countries, and issues relating to risk and receivables management. The results presented here are part of a special analysis of the survey of 3,000 companies from 15 EU countries: Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Slovenia, Poland and Greece.

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. Nine out of ten Germans feel bad if they cannot repay their debts. What is more, they feel much more obliged to pay back debts to relatives and friends than to an online retailer, for example. Just three percent of those polled would settle their bills with online sellers first. The 'EOS Debt Survey' 2017 shows that there are great discrepancies in the way Russians and US Americans feel about debt. In a representative online survey, financial services provider EOS and social research institute forsa compared the attitudes to debt of people in Germany, Russia and the USA.

    Little sense of obligation to repay online shopping debts
    29 per cent of Germans feel the strongest obligation to pay back debt to relatives, 28 per cent to friends or colleagues, and 26 per cent to a bank. Only six per cent feel the same kind of obligation towards a bricks-and-mortar store or service provider, and as little as 3 per cent towards online shops. 39 per cent of Germans would pay debts from internet shopping last. 'Especially in the context of Christmas trading, this is an important insight for retailers that sell their products online. It is therefore recommended that they establish a personal relationship as close as possible with the buyer, to keep the number of payment defaults to a minimum,' says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group.

    'Personal debts' are an emotional burden
    At the same time, 91 per cent of Germans feel bad if they cannot settle debts. 'For Germans, finances are a very personal matter, so they generally find debts to be a burden. From our own experience, however, we also know that they generally try very hard to find a solution, if on occasion they don't have enough money to pay back debts,' says Klaus Engberding about the results of the EOS Debt Survey 2017.

    Different countries, different attitudes to debt
    Unlike Germans, only around three-quarters of people in Russia and the USA feel bad if they cannot pay back their debts. In those countries, the sense of obligation towards creditors known personally to the debtor is also lower: For example, 60 per cent of Russians and 48 per cent of US Americans would pay back debts to a bank first. In Russia only 13 per cent of people and in the USA 18 per cent have the strongest sense of obligation to pay back debts to relatives, on the other hand.


    About the ‘EOS Debt Survey’ 2017
    On behalf of the EOS Group, independent market and social research institute forsa conducted a survey of adults in three countries from 17 August till 4 September 2017. In online interviews, 2,017 people in Germany and 1,005 each in the USA and Russia were asked about their personal attitude to debt, their handling of debt and their own financial status. The results are representative of internet users aged between 18 and 69 in the respective country. In the survey, people are referred to as having debts if they are currently paying back one or several instalment loans, leasing agreements or a mortgage. Further results of the survey are available online at www.eos-solutions.com/debt-survey-2017.
     

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. 55 per cent of Russians are ‘debt avoiders’, ahead of Germans (45 per cent) and US Americans (37 per cent). The ‘EOS Debt Survey’ 2017 shows how people deal with debt differently depending on the country they live in. On behalf of financial services provider EOS, social research institute forsa conducted a representative online survey in Germany, the USA and Russia. It identified five different types of debtor: The ‘careless debtor’, the ‘debt junkie’, the ‘occasional debtor’, the ‘mortgage debtor’ and the ‘debt avoider’.

    The figures: Debtor types compared by country
    Although ‘debt avoiders’ are in the relative majority in all three countries, there are distinct differences in the second-placed categories:

    Typical for Germany is the ‘mortgage debtor, who does not like to take on debt on principle but often does not regard a loan to buy property as real debt. The ‘mortgage debtor’ comes in second place in Germany at 36 per cent – a remarkable level compared with the other countries, especially as this figure has risen by as much as 10 percent points in Germany since 2015. ‘The stable economic conditions in Germany and low interest rates are allowing many Germans to realise their dream of owning a home. However, compared with US Americans, for example, we are more cautious here in Germany and reluctant to take on further debt’, explains Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group.

    ‘Careless debtors’, who service several loans at once, actually come in second place in the USA at 29 per cent, only just behind the top position – but this figure has gone up by nine per cent points since 2015. Professor Manfred Güllner, founder and Managing Director of forsa, explains the background:
    ‘Americans have a strong reliance on credit. But at the same time, due to the lack of state insurance cover in the health system and a partially fee-based education system in the USA, there is also a great necessity to take on debt’.

    In Russia, on the other hand, the second most frequent type is the ‘occasional debtor’, at 27 per cent. Accordingly, every fourth Russian finds debt to be an emotional burden, but is still prepared to take out instalment loans in emergency situations. Because of the low rate of home ownership, mortgage loans only play a subordinate role in Russia. ‘In the ‘Putin era’, the economic situation in everyday life is relatively stable, albeit at a low level for many people. Our figures therefore show little change in the last two years’, says Professor Güllner. Klaus Engberding sheds light on the significance of the results for EOS: ‘The survey makes social and cultural differences transparent. For us as a financial services provider this offers the ideal basis for a better understanding of debtors worldwide and helps us find solutions that are in the interest of all participants’.


    About the ‘EOS Debt Survey’ 2017
    On behalf of the EOS Group, independent market and social research institute forsa conducted a survey of adults in three countries from 17 August till 4 September 2017. In online interviews, 2,017 people in Germany and 1,005 each in the USA and Russia were asked about their personal attitude to debt, their handling of debt and their own financial status. The results are representative of internet users aged between 18 and 69 in the respective country. In the survey, people are referred to as having debts if they are currently paying back one or several instalment loans, leasing agreements or a mortgage. Further results of the survey are available online at www.eos-solutions.com/debt-survey-2017.

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. 78 per cent of Germans have had debts before. And seven per cent of Germans know the feeling of not being able to repay debts. The ''EOS Debt Survey" 2017 shows that Germans are becoming more reticent about taking on debt. Almost nine out of ten Germans (88 per cent) for example, say that they want to keep their debts to a minimum – that is as much as nine per cent more than in 2015. In the USA and Russia this was stated by 67 and 76 per cent of respondents respectively. "What is astonishing is that particularly in Germany, where the economic situation is very good at the moment, there is a mood of reluctance to get into debt. Periods of stable income and the current interest rate situation worldwide actually present the best conditions for making major investments and paying instalments on time,'' says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group, by way of analysis. These facts represent the basic results of the second "EOS Debt Survey" 2017, a representative online poll that was conducted on behalf of financial services provider EOS by social research institute forsa.


    The emotional "debt account"
    Not being able to pay back debts makes people feel bad. This was the experience of nine out of ten Germans (91 per cent), but only three out of four Americans and Russians (76 per cent). This result has gone up by as much as seven per cent in Germany since the first EOS Debt Survey in 2015. Only four per cent of Germans – that is a decrease compared to two years ago – are in favour of taking on debt if they have no money. Nevertheless, only three per cent of Germans would get into debt in order to pay for vacations. For 17 per cent of Russians and Americans, however, this would not be a problem.


    Self-image versus the way others see us: "I'm conscientious, others are reckless!"
    What attitude do Germans have to their own debts – and those of others? Three out of four respondents (73 per cent) assume that nowadays a lot of people have debts. A look at the facts, however, shows that around half of Germans (51 per cent) are currently paying back debts. Anyone who has at some point had difficulties repaying debts usually gave the main reason for this as losing their job (29 per cent) or over-extending themselves financially (24 per cent, in Russia 44 per cent and in the USA 24 per cent). When asked about the general situation in society, however, nine out of ten Germans (89 per cent) believe that the reason for payment difficulties is overextending oneself financially (in Russia 54 per cent and in the USA 48 per cent). Around two thirds of Germans (63 per cent) describe themselves as only taking on debt in absolute emergencies (in Russia 75 per cent and in the USA 40 per cent). "Germans only rarely have problems paying back debt but they assume that their fellow citizens are reckless and take on debt a lot,'' comments Professor Manfred Güllner from forsa. "But one would actually do better to trust one's fellow citizens to generally do the right thing in respect of financial matters."


    Germans dream of owning their own homes – but then buy a car
    In their own estimation, Germans are most likely to take on debt to buy residential property (82 per cent). The purchase of a car or motorcycle comes in third place at 56 per cent. But in reality, 60 per cent of Germans are currently paying off loans, or have done so in the past, for a car or motorcycle – while only about every second has done so for the purchase of real estate (45 per cent). If you leave out mortgages, every third German (33 per cent) is currently paying back debts. Of these, 55 per cent are servicing just one loan, 30 per cent two loans and 14 per cent three or more loans. "The survey confirms our experience that most people generally behave responsibly as far as financial matters are concerned. We basically assume that the vast majority of consumers would like to pay their bills on time, but are sometimes simply unable to do so due to short-term or long-term problems,'' concludes Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group.


    About the “EOS Debt Survey” 2017
    On behalf of the EOS Group, independent market and social research institute forsa conducted a survey of adults in three countries from 17 August till 4 September 2017. In online interviews, 2,017 people in Germany and 1,005 each in the USA and Russia were asked about their personal attitude to debt, their handling of debt and their own financial status. The results are representative of internet users aged between 18 and 69 in the respective country. In the survey, people are referred to as having debts if they are currently paying back one or several instalment loans, leasing agreements or a mortgage. Further results of the survey are available online at www.eos-solutions.com/debt-survey-2017.
     

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. German companies are falling behind when it comes to digitalising their dunning processes. So far, only three per cent of companies in Germany have completely electronically upgraded their dunning and billing systems. At present, one third of companies doubt that digitalisation has a beneficial effect on payment collection. A misconception, as demonstrated by a look at the rest of Europe, where 18 per cent of companies have already completely digitalised their dunning processes – and are reaping the benefits of a better repayment rate, according to 49 per cent of respondents. These were some of the findings of the representative EOS Survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time (by Kantar TNS, formerly TNS Infratest).

    The status quo of Europe's modern receivables management
    Digital dunning means that companies set up and manage dunning processes to be customer-specific and highly automated, for example using big data analyses. Although for the most part companies continue to use software to support the dunning process, staff are often still intervening in the process themselves. In future, the role of employees will change as a result of digitalised processes. Their daily work routine will consist of control tasks and the processing of specific complex cases, instead of a series of individual activities along the entire process chain.
    In Western Europe in particular, companies have already responded to the benefits of digitalisation and have adapted their dunning processes accordingly. Every fifth company here is already exploiting the benefits of a digital dunning system. The trailblazers are Spain (58 per cent), Switzerland (53 per cent) and Hungary (53 per cent).

    German companies sceptical about digitalisation
    European companies are recognising the signs of the times and are increasingly introducing digital processes into their dunning systems. Their expectations of the benefits range from saving time (43 per cent), improved planning of resources (34 per cent), better customer-specific receivables processing (36 per cent) and more automated processes (36 per cent). With the exception of Germany, where only 33 per cent of companies believe digital processes improve outcomes. Across Europe, on the other hand, every second company is confident that a modernised dunning process further reduces payment delays.

    Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group, conjectures: ‘One of the reasons for the scepticism may be that German companies have the lowest rate of payment defaults and so do not see the need to change their collection processes’. But Engberding cautions against continuing to neglect the digitalisation of the dunning system. ‘Companies have to open their eyes to the necessity of digitalisation so they do not fall behind and give money away’.


    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Poland, Russia and Greece answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online:
    ( Verlinkung noch nachtragen http://www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/digitalisation)


    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. The Greek economy is still Europe's underachiever. As recently as this July, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) announced that it would be supporting Greece with another EUR 1.6 billion; however the situation remains precarious in respect of payment defaults. Because in many cases, Greek companies are not able to absorb the resulting hole in their budget. The result is potential insolvency. In a total of 28 per cent of the Greek companies polled, payment delays and defaults put the company's viability in jeopardy – in no other country in Europe is this correlation so strong. In Western Europe, British companies in particular are struggling with the impact of late and unrecoverable payments. As a result, almost every fourth company in the United Kingdom (24 per cent) has to fear for its very existence. These are some of the findings of the EOS survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time (by Kantar TNS, formerly TNS Infratest).

    Countries in crisis – but no widespread pessimism
    In Eastern Europe, Bulgarian companies are also having difficulty in absorbing payment defaults which jeopardise the survival of nearly one in four companies (24 per cent). On average, 17 per cent of Eastern European companies are at risk of bankruptcy as a result of outstanding payments by customers.

    At the same time, the EOS survey shows that the crisis-ridden companies have different views of the future. In Greece, the mood in companies tends to be optimistic, as it was in 2016: 29 per cent (2016: 33 per cent) still expect the payment practices of their customers to improve in the next two years. ‘In this context it is interesting to observe the spirit of optimism in Greece. Fortified by intensive support from Europe for some considerable time, there is a positive mood in the country despite the weak economy’, says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group.

    Things look very different in the UK, where pessimistic voices are on the increase. Whereas in the previous year, only 12 per cent of the companies polled assumed that payment practices would get worse, a total of 19 per cent hold this view in 2017. ‘Brexit has hit the British economy hard. This is reflected in the weak increase in GDP in the first two quarters and the moderate growth forecast by the International Monetary Fund for 2018’, continues Engberding.

    German companies the most stable
    In Western Europe too, payment defaults represent a threat to the viability of many companies. Alongside British firms, French (22 per cent) and Spanish companies (21 per cent) in particular are battling against these consequences. The situation is different in Germany, where companies are better equipped to absorb outstanding payments. Because although in 17 per cent of all cases payments are made late or not at all, only two per cent of all companies see this as a threat to their existence.
    ‘Companies need to be able to compensate for payment defaults. Otherwise they will quickly be paralysed by their own insolvency’, explains Engberding. ‘Working with a professional receivables management provider really can pay, in the truest sense of the word. In addition, companies can focus fully on their core business and do not have to invest any resources in additional expertise.’


    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Poland, Russia and Greece answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online: http://www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. With short payment terms consumers often feel that their hands are tied. But these short deadlines actually do help, because the saying ‘Never put off till tomorrow what you can do today’ also applies to paying your bills. The longer a customer has to pay the more likely they are to get into arrears. This results in late fees for the consumer and outstanding payments for the company. European companies are responding accordingly to this correlation: Compared with the previous year, customers in the B2C and B2B segments have a day less to settle their invoices on time (2017: 35 days, 2016: 36 days). Those 24 hours help achieve more consistent punctuality of payments. In the B2C segment, the punctuality rate was 80 per cent in 2017 (2016: 79 per cent), while B2B customers pay 77 per cent of invoices on time (2016: 76 per cent).  These are some of the findings of the EOS survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time (by Kantar TNS, formerly TNS Infratest).


    The fine line between retaining customers and achieving good payment practices
    'From 2015 to 2016, companies in Europe extended their payment terms. Immediately, a slight deterioration in on-time payments was identified. Currently, companies are revising the terms down again', says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the Hamburg-based EOS Group. 'We are talking about a very fine line here. If payment deadlines are too short customers can be scared off', he adds. 'This is why companies are proceeding with caution and are implementing only very moderate reductions of the terms granted from year to year'.

    Germany benefits from the most punctual payments
    In Western Europe the payment terms are shorter than in Eastern Europe. On average, Western European customers have 33 days to pay their invoices, and the late payment rate is 19 per cent. The country with the shortest payment terms is Germany, which prescribes 24 days on average. Only 17 per cent of customers do not meet this payment deadline. Other countries such as the UK allow much longer time frames of 34 days on average. But the UK also sees a higher proportion of overdue payments (22 per cent).

    Eastern Europe: lots of patience means a lot of payment delays
    In Eastern Europe in particular, companies offer their customers long payment terms. In this region, customers have 37 days on average to settle their invoices, while business customers have as much as 40 days. In 25 per cent of cases, however, customers pay late or do not pay at all. Last year the average payment term was still 38 days and payment delays or defaults stood at 26 per cent. Among the countries substantially cutting their payment terms this year are Romania (2017: 37 days, 2016: 39 days) and Slovakia (2017: 36 days, 2016: 38 days). The correlation between long payment terms and resulting payment delays is most evident in Greece, where customers have an average of 47 days to pay their bills. Despite this, more than a quarter of them (26 per cent) pay too late.

    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Poland, Russia and Greece answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online: http://www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/paymentdeadlines


    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. In Europe, personal predicaments continue to be the main reason for payment delays and defaults. Most customers who fall behind with payments have a short-term cash flow problem (66 per cent) or excessive debt, or have declared themselves bankrupt (52 per cent). This is one of the findings of the EOS survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time (Kantar TNS, formerly TNS Infratest).

    However, the percentage is surprisingly high in the case of what is an avoidable problem: 49 per cent of the companies polled believe that their customers pay late or don't pay at all due to sheer forgetfulness. Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group, takes a differentiated view: 'We basically assume that the majority of consumers would like to pay their bills on time, but often simply cannot due to short-term or long-term problems. If the fridge breaks down for example, or the car that you need for your daily journey to work, then these purchases take priority. Other bills then have to be paid a little later if possible, and so they get forgotten. What is worrying, on the other hand, is when customers are intentionally not paying their invoices – because that is fraud.’

    Wilful intent as a reason for unpaid bills is not uncommon throughout Europe: 38 per cent of the European companies surveyed complain about wilful non-payment in the B2C segment, while in the B2B segment the figure is 34 per cent. Anyone who deliberately ignores their invoices is liable to prosecution: 'Intentional non-payment – for example when buying on account online or deliberately deferring payment instalments – meets the criteria for the crime of fraud and is not a trivial offence', explains the CEO.

    Germany has lowest incidence of wilful non-payment / More common in Eastern Europe than in Western Europe
    Only 10 per cent of companies in the Federal Republic complain about wilful non-payment in the B2C segment. At European level, Eastern European companies are much more likely than Western European firms to complain that consumers deliberately do not pay their bills. A total of 41 per cent regard themselves as having been fraudulently deprived of revenue (34 per cent in Western Europe). At the bottom of the rankings in this respect are Romania (50 per cent), Greece (45 per cent) and the Czech Republic (42 per cent). In Western Europe, Belgian (43 per cent), Austrian (41 per cent) and French companies (40 per cent) report the highest numbers of deliberate non-payers.

    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Poland, Russia and Greece answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online at: www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/wilfulintent

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. Minor cause, major effect: At 29 per cent of the European companies polled, errors of form in invoice handling are already resulting in payment delays and defaults by customers. This is one of the findings of the EOS survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time. Accordingly, an invoice issued too late is just as likely to lead to serious problems as errors such as an incorrect address or the failure to adhere to formal guidelines. ‘Companies are regularly giving away their money because they have not organised their invoicing processes efficiently', says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the Hamburg-based EOS Group.

    But even a perfectly organised invoicing process may not be enough. Companies will need to call in professional receivables management services if their customers still do not pay. In this context, the companies' failings are not just isolated incidents but systemic problems. In some cases there are no standardised processes whatsoever for recovering non-performing receivables. ‘It is striking that the professionalism is actually continuing to decline', Engberding notes. The number of companies admitting to this in the survey has doubled. In 2017, eight per cent of the companies polled stated that they did not have a standardised receivables management. This is up from four per cent in 2016. ‘The work involved in processing non-performing receivables is often underestimated', says the CEO. ‘It calls for a lot of expertise and ties up personnel'. This is why working with debt collection companies is often more expedient than in-house processes. ‘The specialists handle professional receivables management so that companies can concentrate on their core business'.

    Western Europe: German companies the masters of diligence
    As the survey shows, Germany has the most professional organisation of receivables management. In the B2B segment, only two per cent of the companies surveyed said that they did not have any standardised processes for recovering outstanding debts. This was true of four per cent of companies in the B2C segment. French and British firms in particular are facing major challenges. In both countries, 13 per cent of companies do not have any defined organisational structures for recovering outstanding debts from consumers. In the B2B segment, there is also work to be done in the UK, where ten per cent of companies do not have any standardised receivables management.

    Eastern Europe's ‘underachievers’
    A lack of proper procedures for payment collection is most prevalent in Eastern Europe. In the B2C segment, companies in Greece (15 per cent), Hungary and Slovakia (each 14 per cent) in particular are battling this problem. In the B2B segment, companies in Greece, Slovakia and Russia (9 per cent each), are at the bottom of the rankings in this respect.

    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Poland, Russia and Greece answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online at:
    ( Verlinkung nachtragen: www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/invoicingprocesses)

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. For the financial year 2016/17, Hamburg-based EOS Consolidated is reporting an exceptionally good result: At 195.4 million euros, its EBT (earnings before tax) is well above the previous year's total. The debt collection specialist has also significantly increased its sales to 663.8 million euros.

    This success is all the more remarkable given that the competitive pressures are growing: 'Due to expansionary monetary policy, numerous competitors with a lot of capital are swamping the market. Nevertheless we have held our ground very well, particularly in the receivables purchasing segment', says Klaus Engberding, Chairman of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors. EOS Consolidated has substantially increased its investment in this sector. ‘Our expertise in analysing, acquiring and processing non-performing debt portfolios is acknowledged and valued in the industry’, he continues.

    However, EOS was not going to be resting on its laurels. 'Our focus is on the future. For example, we want to further increase our efficiency and therefore are putting even more emphasis than before on data-driven management of debt collection processes.' At 90 million euros, EOS Consolidated is making its largest investment ever in IT systems.

    'We are not just investing in bits and bytes but also in people. To make the best possible use of the opportunities afforded by digitalisation, we need the right mindset’, says Mr Engberding. This is why the Group has initiated a comprehensive change process: 'With our Cultural Journey@EOS we are defining how we are going to be working together in the future and to what end. It is a process that will involve our entire workforce of around 7,000 people worldwide'.

    Overview of key performance indicators:

    2016/17
    Sales revenue (MEUR): 663.8
    EBITDA (MEUR): 222.6
    EBT (MEUR): 195.4

    2015/16
    Sales revenue (MEUR): 596.1
    EBITDA (MEUR): 173.8
    EBT (MEUR): 181.4

    With a 46 per cent share of revenue, Germany remains the company's most important regional market. Compared with the previous year, it grew by 11.1 per cent to 305.5 million euros. Developments in Western Europe were very gratifying, with sales revenue up 33.5 per cent to 164.2 million euros. One reason for this is the strong increase in investments in receivables purchases, for example in France and Belgium.

    In Eastern Europe, sales revenue rose by 21.5 per cent to 131.4 million euros. This is the highest level in the region in the history of the EOS Group to date. The much higher revenue from receivables purchases in Croatia and Hungary made a significant contribution to this pleasing result. In North America, sales revenue fell to 59.5 million euros. This is attributable above all to the downturn in receivables management for government-issued student loans.

    Further details are provided in the latest issue of our annual publication "Insights" at www.eos-solutions.com/insights

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. For the thirteenth time in succession, the auditors from Euler Hermes Rating have awarded EOS Holding an 'A' rating, acknowledging that the debt collection specialist enjoys a good credit standing and long-term viability. The key factors leading to this assessment were the company's excellent earning power over a number of years as well as its good debt repayment capacity and equity base.

    Among the reasons for the rating the auditors cited in particular the long-standing experience of EOS in evaluating, acquiring and recovering non-performing receivables. 'Although we are currently experiencing a fiercely fought market we are consistently demonstrating that the acquisition of debt portfolios is our core area of expertise,' says Justus Hecking-Veltman, CEO and CFO of the EOS Group.

    The auditors also commented on the competitive situation: ‘Due to the higher prices for unsecured receivables, we expect that there will be an ever increasing proportion of investments in mortgage-backed receivables.’ EOS has expanded this business area in recent years and is now also offering this service in several countries in Eastern and Western Europe. 'In this context we benefit from the expertise that we have been building up in Germany for a long time,' says Hecking-Veltman.

    To stay competitive and maintain its technological leadership, the EOS Group is also making major investments in its IT systems. 'We are placing even more emphasis on data-driven management of collection processes.'

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce. For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. Even just one unpaid invoice leaves its mark on a company, let alone hundreds of thousands: For the companies involved these losses can in some cases run into the millions. Just under half of the companies surveyed reported profit setbacks (46 per cent). Other consequences they have to deal with include cash flow problems (39 per cent) and higher interest costs (34 per cent). As a result, the companies lack the money to grow. Across Europe, every fourth company (25 per cent) is therefore curbing its investments. Some companies (17 per cent) are even fighting to survive due to outstanding payments. These are the results of the representative EOS survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017 that is being published for the 10th time this year. A total of 3,200 companies took part in the survey conducted by Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest) in the spring.

    Eastern Europe: Strong brake on investment
    In Eastern European countries in particular, payment delays and defaults are putting a brake on investments. In Greece, 39 per cent of firms are currently cutting back on investments, while in Hungary and Croatia, almost every third company is curbing investment. But in the Czech Republic and Poland, only 18 per cent of business owners feel compelled to do so.

    Few investment cutbacks in Germany
    Despite payment defaults and delays, German companies continue to bank on growth. Only seven per cent of the companies surveyed are investing less. The situation is different in the UK and Spain, where every third company is scaling back its investment volume (34 and 33 per cent respectively). Belgium has the highest percentage of companies reducing investments (28 per cent).

    Klaus Engberding ‘Debt collection counteracts the investment freeze’
    'The level of investment is an important indicator for the growth of a company – and therefore also for the entire economy’, explains Klaus Engberding, CEO of the Hamburg-based EOS Group. 'Numerous factors are considered in the investment decision – but above all you need the financial resources. So missing payments from customers are very painful, especially for SMEs that do not have the backing of financially strong shareholders. But there is a lot that even SMEs can do, particularly against payment defaults and delays.’ For Klaus Engberding, working with debt collection companies is an important method of countering a freeze on investment. Last year, debt collection service providers across Europe secured 8 per cent of company revenue.

    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with independent market research institute Kantar TNS (formerly TNS Infratest), EOS surveyed 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Romania, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Slovakia, Poland, Russia and Greece answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online at: www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/investmentbrake

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • The non-performing loan portfolio contains unsecured debts without mortgage guarantee.

    A Coruña. EOS Spain has been awarded an important debt portfolio of the Spanish national Bank Bankia. The EUR 100 million portfolio contains non-performing loans with no backing of mortgages. It is composed of granular debt positions of SMEs and individuals, mainly loans, credit card financing and, to a lesser extent, credit accounts, guarantees and discounts.

    The sale of this portfolio reduces the balance of doubtful loans of Bankia by EUR 79 million. The sale has followed a competitive process among institutional investors, in which EOS Spain has won the bid. EOS Spain is specialized in the purchase of non-performing loans.

    “The sale of this portfolio allows Bankia to obtain immediate liquidity and free up resources to focus in their core business, meanwhile EOS recovers the debt in an optimal way, acceptable for the debtors and protecting the reputation of Bankia. At the same time, the acquisition strengthens the market position of EOS in the sector of debt purchase”, commented Manuel González, General Manager of EOS Spain.

    About EOS Spain
    EOS Spain, subsidiary of the EOS Group and with its headquarters in A Coruña, is specialized in debt management. The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customized financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With just under 8,000 employees and more than 60 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 28 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.

    Press contact EOS Spain
    EOS Spain S.L.U. 
    Córcega, 371, 6ª planta
    08037 Barcelona
    Phone: +34 933 684 140

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  • Hamburg. Because of payment delays on the part of its customers, a company with an annual turnover of EUR 10 million has to wait for a long time on a sum of around EUR 1.9 million, while EUR 300,000 are completely unrecoverable (19 percent of all invoices in Europe are paid late and three percent are not paid at all). Ultimately, the consequences affect not only the defaulting payers themselves, but all consumers: Every fifth European company (20 percent) reacts to these kinds of payment delays and defaults by cutting jobs and freezing recruitment. Roughly just as many (21 percent) increase their prices – and so the boomerang effect begins. This is one of the findings of the representative EOS Survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time. In spring this year, independent market research institute Kantar TNS polled 3,200 corporate decision-makers from 16 European countries.

    Price increases most frequent in Eastern Europe
    In Eastern Europe in particular, companies react to payment delays or defaults by raising prices. This is most common in Hungary (32 percent), followed by Croatia (30 percent). In Western Europe, British firms are the most likely to increase their prices (26 percent). Only Switzerland comes close (24 percent). In Germany, on the other hand, the response is muted: only four percent of companies react to payment delays and defaults by raising prices.

    Hiring policy: Germany reacts calmly – Greece takes drastic measures
    In respect of a recruitment freeze or job cuts, Greece exhibits the strongest reaction in Europe to payment delays and defaults: in 31 percent of companies polled in Greece, payment defaults impacted on hiring policies. The UK is only slightly behind (29 percent). Romania and Spain are in third place (at 27 percent each). By way of comparison: In Germany, only 6 percent of companies take steps to reduce personnel.

    ‘Many people are not even aware of the consequences of late or unrecoverable payments. We would like to educate people about this and about the importance of debt collection’, says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the Hamburg-based EOS Group. ‘Debt collecting often has a cliché-ridden, negative image among the public. The role it plays in the economy is generally not visible, although this is something that the consumer benefits substantially from. Because the liquidity restored to a company as a result of debt recovery helps it to avoid increasing prices or cutting back jobs.’

    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with the independent market research institute Kantar TNS, EOS polled 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Russia, Greece and Romania answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management. Further results from the survey can be found online at: www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/consumer

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. In Europe, 19 percent of customers pay their invoices late – and three percent do not pay them at all. The resulting loss of revenue can have serious consequences: no less than 17 percent of companies worry about going bankrupt. This means that debt collection services are all the more important to them: A total of 41 percent of the European companies polled work regularly with debt collection providers. Last year these debt collection professionals recovered eight percent of outstanding company revenue. This is the result of the representative EOS Survey ‘European Payment Practices’ 2017, which was conducted this year for the tenth time.

    East-West comparison: Who secures more revenue?
    In Eastern Europe it is mainly Romanian companies that benefit from working with debt collection providers. Every year, collaboration with receivables management specialists returns a total of 13 percent of revenue to the companies. In both Croatia (12 percent) and the Czech Republic (11 percent) debt collection providers have recovered more than ten percent of company revenue. In Western Europe, German companies in particular enjoy the benefits of working with debt collection providers, with an eight percent share of revenue being returned to companies as a result of receivables management services.

    Effective use of receivables management
    Most companies use the payments recovered through receivables management to settle outstanding invoices (58 percent), while 44 percent of the companies invest the money in creating new jobs and safeguarding existing jobs. This means that debt collection providers contribute to the stability of the job market. In addition, the resources recovered go into expanding business segments (37 percent), R&D (28 percent) and investing in the financial markets (25 percent).

    Valuable business service
    ‘Outstanding payments are a risk to companies. Firms should work with debt collection specialists in good time, as it enables them to focus on their core business, while their liquidity is safeguarded by professional receivables management’, explains Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group.

    About the EOS survey: ‘European Payment Practices’
    In the spring of 2017, in partnership with the independent market research institute Kantar TNS, EOS polled 3,200 companies in 16 European nations about the prevailing payment practices in their respective countries. 200 companies in each of the countries Germany, UK, Spain, France, Belgium, Austria, Switzerland, Poland, Slovakia, Czech Republic, Croatia, Hungary, Bulgaria, Russia, Greece and Romania answered questions about their own payment experiences, economic developments in their countries and issues relating to risk and receivables management.

    We are happy to send you details of the survey results on request. Simply email presse@eos-solutions.com. Information on the survey is also available online: www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017/economicdriver

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. Payment practices in Europe are currently at a level of 78% of invoices paid on time. After the overall positive developments over the past ten years, this confirms that payment practices have stagnated. The percentage of invoices paid late (19%) and invoices in default (3%) has not been improving or just slightly improving in the last three years. This is the result of the 'European Payment Practices' 2017 survey conducted by the independent market research institute Kantar TNS on behalf of the EOS Group. Data was collected from 3,200 companies in 16 countries during the survey carried out this spring for the tenth time in a row. 'A payment default rate of 3% can be very worrying for companies. This may include sums in the billions that companies do not have available to cover their own costs or to invest in their future', says Klaus Engberding, CEO of the EOS Group. In Eastern Europe the average percentage of unpaid invoices was even as high as 4%. Payment practices in Greece, Russia, Romania, Bulgaria and Slovakia (74% of payments made on time) were the worst. Companies in Germany (89%) and Switzerland (82%) show the largest number of payments made on time.

    Outlook for the future deteriorates
    Payment practices in Europe have been continually improving over the last ten years, albeit only slightly. Looking to the future, 77% of the companies do not expect any further upswing, which means payment practices will remain the same or get worse. Eastern European companies, in particular, significantly lowered their positive expectations compared to the previous year. The mood in Russia is the most pessimistic. 30% of the companies surveyed expect that payment practices will deteriorate. 'Thanks to the increasing oil prices Russia is moving out of its recession, however structural reforms within the country are still needed to stabilise the economy', states Klaus Engberding. 'However, as of now such reforms are not in sight. The reluctance of businesspeople is understandable'. Negative expectations have also increased by 7% in the United Kingdom compared to the previous year. 'This is not a surprise given the pending Brexit process', the CEO comments. The situation in Spain is more surprising. 'Despite strong growth every fourth person asked assumes that payment practices will still deteriorate. Businesspeople do not see enough stability in the economic upswing', believes Engberding.

    Ten years of 'European Payment Practices'
    EOS has been conducting the 'European Payment Practices' survey since 2007. The Hamburg company analyses the European economic zone together with independent market research institutes. The focus is on customer payment practices in companies with average revenues of 28 million euro and 180 employees. After starting with four countries EOS continued to expand the survey. 16 countries participated this year. 'The collection of data is very time-consuming. We conduct 200 interviews with decision-makers in accounts receivable management in each country', explains Mark Lammers, Associate Director Kantar TNS. 'We have been collecting high-quality data with this method for ten years now. The market assessments that can be derived from this data have a high significance', Lammers continues.  

    Further results from the European Payment Practices survey can be found online at: www.eos-solutions.com/paymentpractices2017

    The EOS Group
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With around 7,000 employees and more than 55 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 26 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.
    For more information please visit: www.eos-solutions.com.

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  • Hamburg. ‘You know what you have to do’ – this message passed on by a husky voice on the telephone to a person in a dark parking garage launches one of the three viral spots placed online by the EOS Group. Today, the specialist for receivables management starts its viral campaign ‘The debt collectors’ way’ on Facebook and YouTube. The films address well-known preconceptions of the debt collection industry in an entertaining way and these are then refuted on the associated campaign website (www.the-debt-collectors-way.com). EOS deliberately plays with some well-known stereotypes with the aim of making the taboo topic of debt collection an objective subject of conversation.

    Debt collection is an important economic service but its public perception is often very detached from reality. ‘We have produced three video spots to showcase reputable debt collection’, says Klaus Engberding, Chairman of the EOS Group’s Board of Directors. ‘Thus, we take responsibility for the professionalism of our industry.’ The unusual approach that EOS takes, is an essential element of the concept: ‘Instead of bone-dry arguments we work with charming short stories’, explains Lara Flemming, Head of Corporate Communications & Marketing of the EOS Group. ‘We very deliberately take aim right at the heart of the stereotypes and preconceptions, address and then resolve them in our films in a light-hearted, twinkle-in-the eye way.’ Making ‘what debt collection truly is’ really clear is just one of the campaign objectives. Ms Flemming: ‘The campaign should be seen as an offer of dialogue. We want to be transparent about our work, to be open and ‘talk with each other, not talk over each other’. 

    The videos were produced under the direction of the Hamburg-based creative agency, La Red. The three videos in the ‘Debt collectors’ way’ campaign can be viewed on the campaign website: www.the-debt-collectors-way.com

    The EOS Group 
    The EOS Group is one of the leading international providers of customised financial services. Its main focus is on receivables management covering three key business segments: fiduciary collection, debt purchase and business process outsourcing. With just under 8,000 employees and more than 60 subsidiaries, EOS offers some 20,000 clients in 28 countries around the world financial security with tailored services in the B2C and B2B segments. Being connected to an international network of partner companies, the EOS Group has access to resources in more than 180 countries. Its key target sectors are banking, utilities and telecommunications, along with the public sector, real estate, mail order and e-commerce.

    For more information please go to: www.eos-solutions.com.You can download high-resolution press photos and further press information here: http://eos-solutions.com/the-debt-collectors-way

    Contact for press queries:
    HOSCHKE & CONSORTEN
    Public Relations GmbH
    Christof Kaplanek
    Tel.: +49 40 36 90 50-38
    Email: c.kaplanek@hoschke.de

    Phil Stephan
    Tel.: +49 40 36 90 50-53
    Email: p.stephan@hoschke.de

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